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Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement 2021-2022

 

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils. It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School Overview

Detail

Data

School name

Manston Primary School

Number of pupils in school

209 (no Nursery)

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

75 - 36%

Academic year/years that current strategy covers

2021-2024

Date this statement was published

December 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

December 2022

Statement authorised by

James Clay

Pupil premium lead

James Clay

Governor lead

Darren Scotland

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£120,080 (increased deprivation indicators)

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£4,930

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years

£0

Total budget for this academic year

£125,010

 

Number

%

Lowest 20%

Rec

8

27

2

Y1

12

40

5

Y2

12

43

5

Y3

12

40

5

Y4

10

33

3

Y5

13

43

3

Y6

8

26

4

Total

75

36%

27

Year Group Numbers 2021-2022

Children were ranked in each year group in the summer term 2021 with best fit teacher assessment. This information will be reviewed in December 2021/January 2022, using formal assessments along with ongoing teacher assessment. The lowest 20% data might change.  

The most recent IDSR showed that phonics, attendance, and exclusion data, needed some explanation. This is now provided, and targeted support is making positive impact in these areas.

Part A: Pupil Premium Strategy Plan

Statement of Intent

 

At Manston Primary School our intention is that all pupils, irrespective of their background or the challenges they face, make good progress and achieve high attainment across all subject areas, discovering and developing talents and interests that they will pursue in later life. The following contextual information gives a good flavour of the eclectic mix within the school. The catchment area is varied and wide. Two thirds of our children come from the Grimes Dyke and Swarcliffe areas, which are not directly next to the school, and one third come from a more affluent estate in Crossgates. The range of living situations tends to lie at two extremes.

“Unemployment is prevalent in some parts of the local area with high levels of social deprivation and increasing incidents of domestic violence and mental health issues. Aspiring families move from the area when the opportunities arise. To address this, we:

  • Form close, supportive, and open relationships with families, allowing appropriate challenge. This is   especially true for families of vulnerable learners
  • Ensure that our school has staff dedicated to supporting our pupils and family’s needs
  • Overcome barriers to learning through school-based support and excellent work with external agencies
  • Give children an aspirational outlook for the future.
  • Excite and enthuse children to learn through a creative curriculum and the development of enterprise skills.” School SEF document 2021-2022

We will consider the challenges faced by vulnerable pupils, such as those who have a social worker and/or are Children Looked After (CLA). The activity we have outlined in this statement is also intended to support their needs, regardless of whether they are disadvantaged or not. High-quality teaching is at the heart of our approach, with a focus on areas in which disadvantaged pupils require the most support. This is proven to have the greatest impact on closing the disadvantage attainment gap and at the same time will benefit the non-disadvantaged pupils in our school. Implicit in the intended outcomes detailed below is the intention that non-disadvantaged pupils’ attainment will be sustained and improved alongside progress for their disadvantaged peers.

 

Our strategy is also integral to wider school plans for Covid education recovery, notably in its targeted support through tutoring programmes within school for pupils whose education has been worst affected, including non-disadvantaged pupils. Our approach will be responsive to common challenges and individual needs, rooted in robust assessment. The approaches we have adopted complement each other to help pupils excel. To ensure they are effective we will:

  • ensure disadvantaged pupils are challenged and supported in their learning
  • act early to intervene at the point need is identified
  • adopt a whole school approach in which all staff take responsibility for disadvantaged pupils’ outcomes and raise expectations of what they can achieve

 

 

 

 

 

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge

Detail of challenge

1

Due to not having a school Nursery, children arrive in Reception class from different settings. This makes the low starting points of some children even lower.  Many are living in language poor contexts and limited life experiences.

 

2

Reading skills are hampered by lack of vocabulary. Assessments, observations, and discussions with pupils indicate underdeveloped oracy skills that are evident from Reception through to KS2.

 

3

Maths can be a struggle for some children who cannot use basic recall to help them tackle maths learning. There is also a lack of confidence and fluency in some pupil premium girls, which can be exacerbated by negative feelings about Maths at home.

4

Attendance – despite a massive range of strategies used to improve attendance, there are still some disadvantaged children with persistent absence. Some of these children have multiple vulnerabilities, that can negatively affect their attendance.

5

Lack of parental support and confidence, stemming from their own educational experiences and other pressures in their lives. 

6

Some families have difficulty paying for extra-curricular activities such as day trips in all year groups and residential experiences in Y5 and Y6

 

Intended Outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Reading & writing attainment and/or progress will be accelerated as soon as children start school, to aid their academic achievements.

From very low starting points, most pupil premium will children reach expected standards by the end of KS2. Data shows how these children make accelerated progress during their academic journey in school.

Maths attainment and/or progress will be accelerated as soon as children start school, to aid their academic achievements.

From very low starting points, most pupil premium children will reach expected standards by the end of KS2. Data shows how these children make accelerated progress during their academic journey in school.

To achieve and sustain improved attendance for all pupils, particularly our disadvantaged pupils.

Sustained, improved attendance demonstrated by:

The overall absence rate for all pupils being as near as possible to the current national average, and the attendance gap between disadvantaged pupils and their non-disadvantaged peers being narrowed.

The percentage of all pupils who are persistently absent being below the current national average, and the figure among disadvantaged pupils being no more than their peers.

 

 

 

 

Activity in this academic year (2021-2022) 

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching

Budgeted cost: £

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenges

Recruitment and retention processes are strong and rigorous. Time is spent well ensuring that the best teachers join the team at Manston

All forms of monitoring teaching and learning such as: lesson visits, pupil voice, work scrutiny and triangulation should show the high calibre of classroom staff. All classes have substantial numbers of adults to pin-point extra teaching when needed.  

1, 2, 3

CPD linked to the curriculum and Quality First Teaching

Evidence by the EEF into its tiered approach model for quality teaching shows how important this is to effective pedagogy and the provision of an enriched curriculum:

  • increased participation in enrichment activities,

particularly among disadvantaged pupils 

  • increased enhancement opportunities – trips,

residentials, visitors; accessed by all through  school

  • a large variety of activities undertaken by pupils throughout the year

1, 2, 3

The school uses the Floppy’s Phonics scheme in its entirety and with fidelity throughout school. This has been well supported by the Jerry Clay Hub.

Floppy’s Phonics training is always being refreshed so that it is delivered in line with the scheme’s directives. The impact on children’s reading is already showing good results. 

‘Reading strategies’ has a high impact on pupil outcomes (+6 months) for a relatively low cost according to EEF research.

1, 2

Frequent time release is given to staff members for them to improve the curriculum offer to all children.

 

All cover is provided by internal staff who the children are familiar with – more settled behaviour and focused learning attitudes.  

Subject leaders, ECT teacher, RQT, well-being time, reading/ phonics leader have time to focus on these areas on a rolling program. 

1, 2, 3

 

Targeted academic support

Budgeted cost: £

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenges

Wide range of school interventions in house, delivered during the school day and some after school for Y6 Maths booster groups.  

Assessment information

Tracking progress of intervention impact

Data analysis

1, 2, 3

To provide interventions and support behaviour there is high staffing in all classes to target children during QFT and improve learning focus.  

EEF research: ‘Behaviour interventions’ has a high impact of (+4 months) for a moderate cost.

1,2,3,5

Phonics interventions are in place for lowest 20% children regardless, but most are disadvantaged. Tracking in place throughout the school (Y3-Y6)

‘Reading strategies’ has a high impact on pupil outcomes (+6 months) for a relatively low cost according to EEF research.

2

Interventions from outside school eg. SEMH workers and playworker sessions. Referrals are made by the safeguarding/wellbeing leader in school.

EEF research: ‘social and emotional learning’ which has high impact (+4 months) for relatively small cost.

1, 2,4, 5

The Tutor Trust charity is used for reading (school led) for 12 Year pupils (8 of whom are disadvantaged, and they are all the PP children in the class). This will continue to target children in Y3-Y5 later in the year.

 

EEF: ‘Tutoring’ has an impact of +5 months for 1:1 tuition, and +4 months ‘small group tuition’

1 , 2

Speech and Language therapist working in school weekly for 0.5

EEF research: ‘Oral Language interventions’ has a high impact +6 months with moderate-to-low cost.

1

 

 

Wider strategies

Budgeted cost: £

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenges

 

To provide enhanced attendance support (and other forms of support) to families in order to achieve and sustain improved attendance for all pupils, particularly our disadvantaged pupils.

 

 

 

Sustained high attendance demonstrated by:

  • the overall absence rate for all pupils being no more than the current national average, and the attendance gap between disadvantaged pupils and their non-disadvantaged peers narrowing.
  • the percentage of all pupils who are persistently absent being below the current national average, and the figure among disadvantaged pupils being no more than their peers.

4, 5

 

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenges

 

 

Lack of parental support and confidence, stemming from their own educational experiences and other pressures in their lives. 

 

Shine charity works with target parents with younger children. They showed how to play games (pm session) and gave them things to go home with. Established relationships between staff and community.  

Remote learning provision and home learning

 

EEF ‘parental engagement’ research: high impact (+4 months) for relatively low cost.

Covid disruption has hindered contact, but a good number engaged with Y1 phonics meetings recently.

EYFS stay and play sessions have been reintroduced. attendance numbers will give engagement information

EEF: ‘Homework’ and remote learning research shows an impact of +5 months for children.

 

5

 

Residential Visits

Y5 – Bewerly Park

Y6 – Bewerly Park

Partly subsidised  

Research on ‘outdoor and adventure learning’ and ‘metacognition and

self-regulation’ has significant impact (+7 months) justifying the high cost.

6

Educational visits, visitors

Life skills experiences

Partly subsidised

 

Research on ‘Outdoor and adventure learning’ and ‘metacognition and

self-regulation’ has significant impact (+7 months) justifying the high cost.

6

Breakfast club is offered to families who need targeted places on an individual basis

Hunger poverty can be a barrier to learning.

4, 5

     

 

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year 20-21

Due to Covid lockdown some impact measures cannot be reviewed as initially intended. This is either because no pupil progress data is available or other planned assessments could not be completed. Where possible we have still reviewed the impact of actions as below in red.

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021.

 

Tier 1 Teaching

Barriers to Learning

Strategies / actions

Cost

Projected Impact

(data where possible)

Actual Impact

Annual Review

Ensuring teaching is of the highest quality through strong recruitment, early carer support and ongoing CPD. Including:

  • Use of Eteach, LCC and gov website to attract a high number of quality applications
  • Rigorous and timely application process
  • Dedicated NQT/mentor release time
  • In class support from experienced teachers for early carers teachers
  • Ongoing CPD for teaching staff links to subject leadership below)

 

 

 

Eteach license - £1000

 

Additional leadership time for recruitment processes - £2000

 

In class support from experienced teachers £15,000

 

 

 

 

Large number of applications allowing for high standard of shortlisting etc.

 

Additional time ensures best candidates are selected and process highlights teaching quality

 

Teachers receive high level support from experienced staff and continual CPD.

 

 

 

 

Successful induction of NQT 20/21

 

Large number of applicants for teaching vacancies led to a full recruitment for a new member of staff.

 

Experienced staff continue to support and provide non-contact time for teachers.

Ensuring teaching is of the highest quality through dedicated leadership time for the school English Lead, Phonics Lead and Maths Lead weekly.

This time is spent:

  • Researching or undertaking CPD
  • Sharing/promoting best practice
  • Monitoring and supporting the work of staff

 

Release time £6,000

 

 

 

 

PSC - %

KS1 - %

Maths – KS1% - KS2%

 

 

Year 2 PSC June 2021 80% achieved the expected standard

 

Year 2 December 2021 86 achieved the expected standard

 

No other statutory assessments took place in 20/21. Leadership actions were focused on CPD linked to recovery and remote learning

 

Monitoring undertaken by leaders provided support and challenge

Ensuring teaching is of the highest quality through high LSA staffing levels throughout school and focused CPD for LSAs who:

  • Supports quality first teaching
  • Provides additional support to early carer teachers
  • Provide pupils with a variety of ‘faces’ for input and learning opportunities

£23,000

As above

High levels of staffing maintained. In lower school this is directly evidenced by our PSC outcomes and ongoing internal phonic data.

Despite restrictions due to Covid many interventions took place in school and some virtually.

Tier 2 Targeted Academic Support

Barriers to Learning

Strategies / actions

Cost

 

Projected Impact

Actual Impact Annual Review

Disadvantaged pupils need additional support and input to close the gap through:

  • Additional teaching staff supporting pupils in the class
  • In small groups
  • 1:1

 

 

 

 

 

£2,000 (Covid catch up funding will cover main part of cost – not included costs of experienced teachers)

 

 

Data – Specific pupils/class targets will be set in January 2021 during pupil progress meetings when the impact of school closure is better understood and more ‘rounded’ assessments of pupils have been completed.

 

Impact not measurable due to Covid

Speech and language therapy (SALT)

£2500

Pupils development against key targets – Feedback from SaLT

Remote session were provided for key pupils. In school sessions continued when possible. 3 PP pupils have been reported to be making rapid progress in the Autumn 21 term.

Additional Boosters for Year 6 after school & Lunchtimes

 

£2000

 

 

Outcomes – as above for January 21 data targets

 

Boosters completed with 5 number of PP achieving EXS and 1 achieving GD on internal assessments

Intervention resources and staff training for interventions such as – Talk boost, ALK and Units of sound, SPaG.com

 

 

 

 

£6750

 

 

 

Individual outcomes as tracked through interventions.

 

 

 

 

Pupils completed interventions where possible.

Tier 3 Wider Strategies

Barriers to Learning

Strategies / actions

Cost

 

Projected Impact

Actual Impact

Annual Review

Poor attendance of pupils is a significant barrier to learning. Having a clear and challenging attendance policy including:

  • CPD and sharing of best practice for SGWO
  • Dedicated time for attendance meetings half termly
  • Admin work related to attendance matters including record keeping, meeting paperwork and communication
  • Time to directly support families with attendance
  • Time to work with other agencies to improve attendance

£18,000

Improved attendance

Attendance data below shows the positive impact of staff on PP attendance including the number of PP pupils who were PA.

Attendance %

2018-2019

2019-2020 (Covid)

2020-2021 (Covid)

Whole school (all)                 

94.8

94.5%

97%

Disadvantaged learners   

91.3

91.6%

95.1%

Persistent absence* (all)

13% of school

18.01% of school

4.2% of school

Disadvantaged persistent absence

8.3% of school

32.73% of PP pupils

10.9% of school

32.4% of PP pupils

3.3% of school

9.46% of PP pupils

Child looked after / PP+

98.69% (2 Pupils)

97.76% (2 pupils)

95.7% (1 pupil)

Service pupils

NA

NA

NA

 

 

*Persistence absence is based on a pupil having attendance of less than 90%.

 

 

 

 

Under performance of CLA/SEND pupils – Staffing and leadership time (SENDCo, SGWO and LM) to ensure

  • high quality provision is in place for CLA/SEND pupils
  • communication with stakeholders facilitates ongoing and developing quality provision
  • time to directly support pupils and families is given

 

£18,500

Individual progress of key pupils

SEND pupils given additional/alternative remote learning resources.

 

Learning mentor time to address SEMH issues and provide support to pupils

£2000

 

Improved academic outcomes for pupils

SDQ analysis show positive impact on SEMH issues

 

SDQs show improvement for key pupils. Case studies evidence individual progress.

Additional Interventions such as 1:1 counselling, play therapy and other targeted support

£7000

Improved academic outcomes for pupils

SDQ analysis show positive impact on SEMH issues

 

SDQs show improvement for key pupils. Case studies evidence individual progress.

Additional support from SGWO at breakfast club to allow school to host pupils in need and provide short term support (attendance, SEMH, home issues…)

£2000

Pupils are supported to come to school happily and barriers to learning are removed.

See attendance data for evidence of improved attendance overall and for PA PP pupils.

Lunchtime nurture provision for vulnerable pupils

£1500

Behaviour records show reduction in issues at key times

Ongoing. Several pupils have returned to regular provision, others continue to access. Behaviour records for pupils shows positive impact of provision.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KS2 outcomes 2019

Outcomes

School - all children

School – PP children

School gap

Gap to national PP

GAP to nat not PP

EYFS 2019 results

GLD

72%

38%

-34%

-35.2%

-35.2%

Phonics

63%

55%

-12%

-15.7%

-26.8%

KS1 2019 results

Reading

72%

57%

-20%

-6%

-21%

Writing

69%

57%

-16%

-16%

-16%

Maths

72%

71%

-1%

-8%

-8%

RWM

66%

43%

30%

%

%

KS2 2019 results

Reading

79%

73%

-6%

-5%

-5%

Writing

86%

73%

-13%

-10%

-10%

Maths

86%

73%

-13%

-11%

-11%

RWM

79%

73%

-6%

-2%

+2%

 

KS2 Subject 2019

Progress Measure

Reading

-0.48

Writing

0.04

Maths

-0.06

 

This data mirrors the progress journey from entry in Reception to exit from Y6. Low starting points in EYFS show the lack of basic skills and how learning is steadily accelerated through KS1. This progress then continues through KS2 until most children reach national expectations. The PP gaps are larger in KS1 because early intervention helps. Then in KS2 tests pupil premium attain even better.

Externally provided programmes

Programme

Provider

TT Rockstars

Maths Circle

Numbots

Maths Circle

Bugclub books

Pearson

Units of Sound -license

Units of Sound

Floppy’s Phonics

Oxford Press

Maths No Problem

Maths no Problem

 

Service pupil premium funding

Measure

Details

How did you spend your service pupil premium allocation last academic year?

N/A

What was the impact of that spending on service pupil premium eligible pupils?

N/A

Further information

In planning the new pupil premium strategy, past activities undertaken in previous years were evaluated to judge whether they had a positive impact on pupil outcomes, which had not, and the reasons why.

It is also very important to appreciate that many of our pupil premium children have multiple vulnerabilities such as SEMH, absence issues, SEND. Our whole child approach caters for every child’s needs.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

End of document

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